Constituency boundary changes: A missed opportunity?

By Marcus Edwards. The constituency boundary changes are a necessary measure to equalise the number of voters in each constituency. This is a positive step towards a more representative and true democracy.  If we are focused however on changing our democracy for the better in time for the 2020 election, then there are many more … Continue reading Constituency boundary changes: A missed opportunity?

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London is headed towards democratic dysfunction in 2020

By Areeq Chowdhury. 2016 witnessed a memorable moment of history for the UK’s capital city when Sadiq Khan was elected the first Muslim Mayor of London.  An outsider when he announced his candidacy, Khan managed to defeat his Conservative rival Zac Goldsmith by more than 300,000 votes, gaining the largest personal mandate of any politician … Continue reading London is headed towards democratic dysfunction in 2020

Pickles’ election reforms risk creating further barriers to voting

By Areeq Chowdhury. I've finally had the chance to have a read of Eric Pickles' long-awaited review into electoral fraud, and I think I agree with the analysis which describes it as the use of "a sledgehammer to crack a nut." Whilst a lot of the recommended reforms are welcome in the way they strengthen … Continue reading Pickles’ election reforms risk creating further barriers to voting

It’s not what we decide on Thursday that’s worrying me. It’s how.

By Nathalie Hulbert. Young people are being wrongfully underrepresented, and for no good reason. With the EU referendum fast approaching, it would appear that the younger and older generation are becoming increasingly polarised. Opinion polls conducted by the BBC reveal a truth that we already knew. A truth that is evident in the disparity between talking to our parents … Continue reading It’s not what we decide on Thursday that’s worrying me. It’s how.

What referendum? How the credibility of British politics pivots on a developing democracy

By Joe Carton. It’s Thursday, 23rd June 2016. 7:00am. Two weeks into the European Championships and four days before the start of Wimbledon. The alarm on your phone rattles the room. Disbelieving, you bury your head in the pillow. It’s still on the ‘Marimba’ jingle. You need to remember to change that. One arm emerges … Continue reading What referendum? How the credibility of British politics pivots on a developing democracy

Online voting: The future of voting? Observations from Salt Lake City

By Mike Summers. For a country which seeks to lead the world in terms of technological innovation and has spent billions of dollars in modernising their election process, it seems puzzling that online voting hasn’t made more progress in terms of becoming part of the United States electoral process. Maybe this is about to change. … Continue reading Online voting: The future of voting? Observations from Salt Lake City

Local Government: An avenue for online voting?

By Councillor James Beckles. Local authorities are at the heart of our communities; they deliver a wide range of services we need and their role ultimately is to improve the lives of the people of the communities they serve. Local government is often the first democratic institutions many of us interact with knowingly or unknowingly … Continue reading Local Government: An avenue for online voting?

Intergenerational unfairness: online voting is key to strengthening the voice of Britain’s disillusioned youth

By Joe Carton. The British political system is painfully neglecting the country’s youth. Choosing to pander to the baby boomer generation with generous offerings of a pension ‘triple lock’ and an array of retirement benefits, Britain’s main political parties are suppressing the aspiration of today’s youth by failing to address the growing disparity in wealth … Continue reading Intergenerational unfairness: online voting is key to strengthening the voice of Britain’s disillusioned youth

The NSW iVote project – Internet based voting in Australia

By Sam Campbell. In March 2015 the state of New South Wales, known locally as NSW, in Australia held the largest (well - at the time anyway!) binding government Internet delivered election in the world with over 280,000 votes using their iVote system.  An election channel that was extremely well received by voters (recording an astounding 97 … Continue reading The NSW iVote project – Internet based voting in Australia

Constituents should be able to vote online on issues like Syria airstrikes

By Alex Wiltshire. A decision regarding any military action in Syria should be undertaken with close consultation with the electorate, and an online constituent vote could be the perfect solution. The House of Commons will on Wednesday hold a debate and subsequent vote on whether the UK should extend its bombing campaign against the so-called … Continue reading Constituents should be able to vote online on issues like Syria airstrikes